Outdoor Rock Climbing Group 2016 Sierra Club. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com  
Silence surrounded me. A thousand feet above the valley floor, the environment was so frozen in white that it seemed time. The snow was lying heavily on the mountains. The faint clouds hang down and stretch like wool along the peaks. Snow and clouds seemed to absorb any sound. I felt like I had forgotten how to hear, what day it was, or anything but the wall of snow and ice in which I had sunk. I was upهیالیتto the

Lindsay Robinson in Mummy II WI3. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Gregory Schillinger in the WW4 Sherbert Campaign. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
The silence was broken by the faint shaking of the ice instruments, and Devin climbed the cliff and joined me. “My forearm is burning,” he said. I agreed with a smile. We still had some more land before the route was completed. Devin and I were climbingThe Lost Land, WI4, which is a long, winding icy pathValley of WisdomIt gives each land a different view of the frozen valleys and waterfalls that were first climbed decades ago by men like Alex Lowe and Conrad Anker. Sometimes we could seeWinter Dance, Scary ice hangs like a bite on top of our path. Sometimes we glance atTwin FallsAnd soaringCleopatra needleIn front of and above the valley of us; We can also look downNameless wallAndFat oneWhere we had climbed both the rock and the ice a few days earlier.

هیالیتIt certainly has the highest concentration of icy natural water in the United States. It looks like a frozen rainforest. The rock walls behind snow and ice are mostly basaltic andesites composed of ancient lava flows. Conglomerate rock hills are found in the upper layers where sediments are deposited by volcanic activity from volcanic activity.Yellow StoneMore than one glacier was carved millions of years agoهیالیتIt is U-shaped and extends the remains of the rock to the bottom of the valley.

Gregory Schillinger and Isaac Tifford at the WI4 Sherbert Campaign. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Devin and I were part of aSierra Outdoor Military ClubAnnual ice climbing tripValley of WisdomWithMontana Alpine GuidesEveryone in our group had a history of mountaineering or mountaineering, but our main common denominator was that we each served in the military. Several men came from thereArmyAndNavyAreas ; Devin had served in itMarinesAnd I inAir forceMost of us have not been with a group of veterans since leaving the military.

Gregory Schillinger is climbing the nameless wall. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Kyle Burton ascends to Genesis I WI3 +. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Band on anonymous wall. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
For five nights, we all campedهیالیتShare hot foods and coffee and resist cold winter fingers. Around the fire we laughed at each other as we learned stories of military life.

Rock Window Cabin, Healy Valley, Caster Galatian National Forest, Montana. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Rock Window Boiler, Hyalite Valley, Custer Galatian National Forest, Montana. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Barbecue Rock Window Cab, Healy Valley, Custer Galatian National Forest, Montana. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Barbecue Rock Window Cab, Healy Valley, Custer Galatian National Forest, Montana. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
After Action Review. Rock Window Cabin, Healy Valley, Caster Galatian National Forest, Montana. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
During the day, we pushed each other to climb better, longer and harder. I can say that there was immediate trust and camaraderie in rock climbing with people who were stationed and knew the ups and downs of serving in the armed forces.
  
Approaching the climbs.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Climbing The Fat One WI3.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Return to the cabin for the night.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
The day Devin and I climbedThe Lost Land, Our guide Adam commented on the strength of the military teams he led in the mountains. I can see how dealing with a difficult and miserable military deployment can help veterans quickly adapt to difficult conditions in nature. However, there is a human enemy in war. In the mountains, there are challenges and dangers to overcome, the risk of death or injury is very real, but there is no real enemy. I realized that Adam had probably lost many of his friends on treacherous journeysHimalayaAs I lost in itOperation Enduring Freedomto the

Umbilical cord training of lead technique in mummy II WI3.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Adam Noff of Montana Alpine GuidesPhoto © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Bitter and painful experiences can make us feel isolated, but being with women and men who have gone through difficult times can help restore a broken spirit. Spending time in the mountains, in the wild, for guides like Adam is as important as it is for veterans.

Issac Teaford on Champaign Sherbert WI4. Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Isaac Tifford – United States Navy Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Being on a wall of fragile ice forces you to exist only in the present. The mind is focused on the crampons and the tip of the ice tools, the pressure of the body on the ice – nothing else. Stress and confusion of jobs, relationships, money, past mistakes and future plans – everything is cleared so that the mind and body can feel the ice and maintain vertical progress up to the top of the waterfall.
“Sometimes you have to stop pursuing happiness and just be present,” Adam said as we landed.ppy. “I am,” I said to myself, pausing between our shocking steps in the snow.

Lindsay Robinson – United States Air Force

Lindsay Robinson – United States Air Force Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


Robert Wessels – US Army, Sierra Club Outdoor Military Program Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


Gregory Schillinger – United States Navy Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


Kyle Burton – US Army Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


Devin Duvall – United States Navy Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com

Steve Sieger – US Army Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


Dan Shoemaker – US Army, Sierra Club Outdoor Military Program Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


Sam Magro – Montana Alpine Guides Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com


 

Nathan Smith – US Army, Mount Liberty OfficerPhoto © Jake Hirsch


The purpose of Sierra Outdoor Military Club This is to ensure that service members, veterans and their families have the skills, knowledge, knowledge and confidence to access the outdoors. Spending time in nature not only increases mental health, emotional resilience and leadership development before dispatch, but also provides valuable knowledge to help veterinarians return and enjoy nature after returning from dispatch. Many veterans face the problem of adapting to civilian life after leaving the service. Spending time outdoors facilitates the transition and improves both mental health and social skills. Provide quality experiences from service members, veterans and their families in developing a new generation of Sierra Club leaders and supporters from within the military community and veterans, including family members, who will work hard to achieve the Sierra Club’s mission. Become external leaders in their communities.

In March 2016, Mount Liberty was proud to support the Sierra Club’s outdoor military program on an ice-climbing trip to Hyalite Valley on top of Bozeman, Montana. We believe in the power of outdoor space and its restorative nature. For more information on Sierra Club Military Outdoors, visit:sierraclub.org/outings/military

“I was not sure I would be expected to retire on this mountaineering trip as a more mature veteran in 2000, but it was great! The connection between Montana Landscape veterans and the professionalism of the guides made it an experience if I was scared at the beginning of the trip, they were soon cleared with excitement and challenge, I was proud to be selected for this experience, I am proud to be part of this group and I wish until the last day “It lasted a little longer.”

Steve Ciger – US Army

Steve Sieger in The Fat One WI3. Nameless Wall, Hyalite Valley, Montana.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
“The canyon trip was my first exposure to ice and mixed mountaineering, but it certainly boosted my love of the outdoors and my passion for mountaineering in general. Being with other veterans and great guides made for a great experience. “Mountaineering has an impact on the hierarchy that I have always sought outside of me, where all the noise and worries of life are put aside by being in the moment and surrounded by beautiful scenery.”

Devin Duvall – US Navy

Devin Duval in The Fat One WI3. Nameless Wall, Hyalite Valley, Montana.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
“Spending time in the mountains, in the wild, for guides like Adam is as important as it is for veterans. Being on a wall of fragile ice forces you to exist only in the present. Mind on Crampon Clusters And the tip of the iceberg, the pressure of the body is focused on the ice – nothing else. The stress and confusion of jobs, relationships, money, past mistakes and future plans – everything is cleared so that the mind and body can feel the ice. And maintain vertical progress to the top of the waterfall. “

Lindsay Robinson – United States Air Force

Lindsay Robinson is perched on a pillar behind a Lotto Cave. Nameless Wall, Hyalite Valley, Montana.Photo © Nathan Smith – Pullphotography.com
Mountains and climbs are an important part of my life. The beauty and loneliness I find there is invaluable in balancing my life. The friendships I have found in mountaineering are the closest I have come to the camaraderie and teamwork I have experienced in the military. Joining this large group of veterans in the land of the boys was an amazing experience that I hope to repeat in some cases.

– Nathan Smith – US Army, Freedom Mountain Officer

Nathan Smith in the WI4- shaft elevator. Nameless wall. Valley of Hilal, Montana Photo © Sherry Smith – Pullphotography.com



Nathan Smith pullphoto photos Pullphotography.com

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