There are two key nodes to rapping. The first is a smooth bend and the second is a barrel knot (sometimes referred to as a choke knot). In the video below, Jullie Ellison of Climbing Magazine shows these two important nodes …

Bending upwards (also known as the Euro death knot) is to tie two ropes together. The main reason we use this another knot is how it mounts on the ground when pulling the rope. There is a knot on one side of the closed ropes, which makes you less caught when pulling the ropes …

As Julie points out, some people are worried that the bend in the bed will spin on its own and come out of the end of the ropes. In the video, he shows that he is tying the knot very far from the end of the rope. This length prevents the knot from rolling. There are a few other things you can do to avoid getting tied up …

In this first photo, I closed an extra round around both strands.
This reduces the chance of rolling.

In this second photo, I made two straight bends and put myself on top of each other.
This is my preferred style and I tie my loops with these as well as my ropes to the loops.

Some people think that if they connect two ropes with a smooth shape of eight, it will be stronger. Ironically, it is extremely weak and can rotate at 2kN (less than 500 lbs). Using the flat shape of eight to tie two ropes together has been fatal.

Julie goes on to talk about tying the barrel knots at the end of the rope. He recommends triple tube knots, but they are twice as good, as long as they are tight. A two-way barrel knot can be untied.

Knots two barrels.

Climbers and historical guides did not tie the knot at the end of their rope. They were afraid that the ropes would get stuck underneath. That is changing. There have been many accidents because there were no knots in the ropes. If you are worried that the end of the rope will get stuck, tie one end of the rope in a row or an eight and tie it to your restraint during the rappel …

-Jason Di Martin





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